Types of Good and Bad Fats

By: | Tags: | Comments: 0 | July 28th, 2018

We will only refer to organic or edible fats: i.e. dietary fats, fats are an important part of the diet, but some of them are healthier than others. Choose healthy vegetable fats over less healthy animal fats, which will help us lower our risk of heart attack, stroke and other major health problems.
What are fats?
Fats are a type of nutrient obtained from food. It is essential to eat some fats, but not too much. The fats we consume give the body the energy it needs to work properly. During exercise, your body uses the calories from the carbohydrates you’ve eaten, but after 30 minutes, exercise depends in part on the calories from fat to go on. Fat also helps you absorb vitamins A, D, E, and K, called fat-soluble vitamins.
The fats the body gets from food provide it with essential fatty acids called linoleic acid and linolenic acid. They are called essential because our metabolism cannot produce them on its own or does not work without them. The body needs them for brain development, control of inflammation and blood clotting.
Fat has 9 calories per gram, more than 2 times the number of calories from both carbohydrates and protein, which have 4 calories per gram. That’s why high-fat foods are called high-calorie foods.

Types of fats:

Saturated fats raise the level of LDL (or bad) cholesterol. This puts us at risk for heart attack, stroke, or other major health problems. We must avoid or limit foods high in saturated fat – keep saturated fat less than 6% of your total daily calories.
Foods with a lot of saturated fats are animal products, such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. These fats are solid at room temperature.
A diet high in saturated fat increases the buildup of cholesterol in the arteries. Cholesterol is an oily substance that can cause blockage or blockage of the arteries, we all produce it because it is a fundamental part of the cell wall and for the production of hormones.
Eating unsaturated fat instead of saturated fat can help us lower LDL cholesterol. Most vegetable oils that are liquid at room temperature have unsaturated fats. It is important to read nutrition labels on foods. This will help you know what types of fats they contain and in what amounts.
EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. They are essential because our body needs them to function properly and is not able to produce them on its own.
Both fatty acids pass through numerous biological systems to promote human health. DHA has a beneficial effect on cell membrane structure and assists in normal growth and development. EPA is beneficial from a physiological perspective in regulating the anti-inflammatory response. In addition, along with other PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) such as DPA (docosapentaenoic acid), ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), they provide numerous and important and are critical for maintaining homeostasis.
As a result, we depend on our diet and supplements for the Omega-3 fatty acids needed to maintain a number of extremely important biological functions.
MONOUNSATURATED

ABOUND IN:

Olive oil.
Some nuts (hazelnuts, almonds, macadamia nuts).
Some fish (cod, mackerel, herring).
Birds (chicken, duck) Avocados.
HEALTH EFFECTS:
They lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol.
They reduce cardiovascular risk.
The foods they contain are often rich in antioxidants.
OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS
ABOUND IN:
Blue fish.
Nuts.
Soybean oil.

HEALTH EFFECTS:

Improve blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
Reduce the risk of arrhythmias.
They have an anticoagulant effect.
Beneficial against some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.
OMEGA 6 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

ABOUND IN:

Vegetable oils (sunflower, corn or soybean).
Some nuts (walnuts, pine nuts).
Sunflower seeds.
HEALTH EFFECTS:
They reduce bad cholesterol, but they also reduce good cholesterol.
They are not recommended for frying because they degrade in the heat and become unhealthy fats.
SATURATED

ABOUND IN:

palm or coconut oil
Red meat.
Non-skimmed dairy products (milk, cream, cheese, butter…).
Most of the sausages.
HEALTH EFFECTS:
They raise bad cholesterol and cardiovascular risk.
They increase the risk of some cancers (colorectal, breast…).
TRANS

ABOUND IN:

Industrial pastries.
Fast fried foods.
Precooked fried foods.
Some margarines….

HEALTH EFFECTS:

They raise bad cholesterol.
They seem to lower good cholesterol.
They increase cardiovascular risk.

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